Crowdified! This project has been successfully funded on 08. November 2017. Thanks to the 92 boosters that made it possible!

Bring light into darkness

Solar energy for Wayuu-indigenous peoples

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104%
10.425 CHF
of 10.000 CHF
 
Crowdified
hurray!
92
Boosters
supported project
Bring light into darkness
Bring light into darkness
Bring light into darkness
Bring light into darkness
Bring light into darkness
Bring light into darkness
Bring light into darkness
Bring light into darkness
Bring light into darkness
Bring light into darkness
Bring light into darkness
Bring light into darkness

Funding goals

  1. Stage 1:

    7.000 CHF

    100% funded

  2. Finish Stage:

    10.000 CHF

    104% funded

In short
This project supports the Wayuu, an indigenous community in Columbia. We aim to provide at least 100 households with solar lamps and solar panels. We focus on women, since they are the care taker in this indigenous society.

Women are key
This project focuses on Wayuu women, because they are the main providers for their families, they raise the children, and take care of the environment. Wayuu society is matrilineal, which means that duties, responsibilities and possessions are inherited following the female lineage.

Plea
At Mama Tierra, we need your support to help us turn the wish of the Wayuu, to have light and electricity, into reality: to have access to basic comfort thanks to electricity. Our goal is to provide a hundred households with power produced by solar panels. The more money we can raise, the more families we can reach and help. In exchange for your support we offer attractive goodies. Thank you very much for your support and helping us to bring light into darkness.


Bring light into darkness
Bring light into darkness
The Wayuu live in a remote corner of Colombia in the Caribbean desert. They neither have direct access to water nor electricity. Climate change has caused their land to become less fertile and it has not rained for years. These conditions make agriculture and the production of vegetables and other food almost impossible. Poverty and infant mortality are major challenges for the community. Due to the remoteness of the area, the next villages are a 10 hour drive away, income opportunities are very limited.
Zugang zu Solarenergie wird das Leben der Frauen einfacher gestalten. Die Lampen werden die Wayuu nutzen, um die dunkeln Wege zu belichten. Frauen, die sich normalerweise um die Senioren und Kinder kümmern, hätten es einfacher, während der Nacht nach ihren Familienangehörigen zu schauen. Ausserdem wird durch Licht in der Nacht mehr Sicherheit gewährleistet. Stromzugang würde es auch ermöglichen, kleine Unternehmen zu gründen. Beispielsweise würden einige Familien gerne einen Kiosk, dank eines Kühlschranks, betreiben.
Bring light into darkness
Bring light into darkness
On our last journey, the Wayuu expressed the wish to get access to light and electricity. Light, to make everyday life easier, and power to charge electronic devices, such as cell phones and refrigerators. This would spare them from long walks to other villages where electricity is available, only to charge their devices. With refrigerators food could be stored safer and for longer periods without spoiling. Moreover, electricity would make it easier for the Wayuu to connect with other people and keep in touch, conduct business, and access information and knowledge about the outside world through radio or by phone. Some families are interested in running a small business, such as a kiosk. A convenience store or a kiosk, selling food and cold beverages is only possible when having a fridge, would allow them to earn an income and feed their families.

Furthermore, access to light at night provides better security and makes life in general easier. The Wayuu plan to use the solar lamps to lite up the dark footpaths at night and the inside of their houses. This will allow the Wayuu women to better look after their children and the elderly, especially during night-time.
Bring light into darkness
A valuable resource for the indigenous Wayuu is their handcraft, especially produced by the women, in particular the women, using unique crochet and knitting techniques. Moreover, they create straw huts, hammocks and jewelry. Every item is unique and every person has her or his own particular style. Often the patterns have cosmological significance and tell a story, which is handed down by generations. Mama Tierra supports the Wayuu by promoting and selling their craft on the global market. We provide them with the necessary material and collect the items once they are ready to be sold. And most of all, we pay fair wages and thus help the Wayuu secure an income.
Bring light into darkness
The more capital we are able to fundraise, the more families we will benefit. For your engagement, we have many great surprises.
Help us to bring light there where is darkness.

Thank you very much for your support!
Katherine Klemenz
Katherine Klemenz
MA. Communications and Marketing

Katherine Portmann is CEO of Mama Tierra in charge of fundraising and marketing. As half Swiss and Venezuelan with indigenous roots, she builds a bridge between both countries. Her studies in communication science and marketing, professional experience in top communication agencies allowed her to build the Mama Tierra brand, driving sales and donation of the Mama Tierra’s online shop. Her degree in fundraising management helps to increase Mama Tierra’s fundraising. Currently she is studying at the University of Zürich social anthropology with a special focus in material culture.Katherine speaks 6 languages.

Katherine Klemenz
Katherine Klemenz
Baden, CH
Dr. Social Anthropology

MAMA TIERRA is a Non-Profit Organisation registered in Switzerland and Colombia, active also in Venezuela. In Spanish MAMA TIERRA stands for Mother Earth, especially the indigenous woman inspired us: She earns the family’s living, brings up the children, struggles for the preservation of the nature and passes on the indigenous heritage.



By selling ethnic art, we support the financial independence of the indigenous women. Dr. Rosa Enn was born in Salzburg, Austria and has lived in Zurich, Taipei, Vienna and Salzburg. She obtained her doctoral degree in Social and Cultural Anthropology at the University of Vienna. Her fields of expertise are environmental justice and indigenous peoples with regard to their social, cultural, and legal positions within national and international discourses, human rights, and political ecology.



Her recent publications discuss the heritage of colonialism and the impact of a nuclear waste repository on the socio-economic structures of the indigenous Tao community of Taiwan’s Orchid Island. Dr. Enn advises the international NGO Asian Health Literacy Association in Geneva and at the United Nations.

Lourdes Grollimund
Lourdes Grollimund
Dr. Geophysik

Lourdes Grollimund is the president of Mama Tierra and is a Venezuelan living in Toronto. She grew up reading stories from indigenous tribes and was particularly fascinated by the rich fantasy of the Wayuu people. Lourdes completed her studies in Geophysics at the Simón Bolívar University and in the US, where she graduated from a Masters and PhD degrees in Geophysics at Stanford University. Her goal is empowering people in her country through education, employment and humanitarian help to avoid their abuse. Lourdes is a mother of two.

Rolf Klemenz
Rolf Klemenz
Economist and IT-Specialist

Rolf is Swiss and has been working as an IT manager for the past 20 years, mainly in the financial services sector. He holds the position of the treasurer at Mama Tierra and maintains the IT infrastructure. Rolf brings important experience in strategic development and economics to the team, having supported projects worth millions of Swiss Francs for a leading Swiss bank.

He holds a Bachelor in Business Information Systems.

Alex Steele
Alex Steele
Prof. for development cooperation

Alex Steele is a member of the Board of Directors at Mama Tierra. He has worked as consultant and coach for the last 25 years. As such, Alex has been leading organisational development and innovation within industry and government. Alex is a Visiting Professor in Transformational Learning and Sustainable Development at ULAB University in Bangladesh and he is an associate academic with the London Business School and Ashridge Business School in the UK. Alex's expertise includes environmental management, sustainable development, community development, corporate social responsibility, innovation and leadership development. Alex is the Founding Director of Improwise, an organisation supporting organisations and communities to bring about change and innovation, in Europe, Africa, Asia and South America. Alex has a parallel career as a professional jazz pianist. He is a father of three.

MAMA TIERRA
MAMA TIERRA
Non-profit organization

MAMA TIERRA is a non-profit organization, which supports indigenous people in their strive for self-determination, human rights and environmental protection. In Spanish MAMA TIERRA stands for Mother Earth, especially the indigenous woman inspired us: She earns the family’s living, brings up the children, struggles for the preservation of the nature and passes on the indigenous heritage.

By selling ethnic art, we support the financial independence of the indigenous women.

News

We made it!

We made it!

. Publish by Initiator.
Dear all, It is unbelievable but we have slightly passed the target amount of 10'000 CHF! We from Mama Tierra a...
Dear all, It is unbelievable but we have slightly passed the target amount of 10'000 ...

Popular goodies

CHF 45

Ethnic-Clutch

CHF 30

Friendship bracelet

CHF 65

Mother Earth pillows

News

We made it!

We made it!

. Publish by Initiator.
Dear all, It is unbelievable but we have slightly passed the target amount of 10'000 CHF! We from Mama Tierra a...
Dear all, It is unbelievable but we have slightly passed the target amount of 10'000 ...

Boosters

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CW
Alternative Bank  Schweiz
A
MK
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Location La Guajira